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Unseen Danger: Navigating Snow Bridge Hazards

Last Sunday, search and rescue teams responded to an emergency call from a popular early-season climb in the Olympic mountains. Two climbers slipped on a steep snowy slope while climbing The Brothers. One fell “into an opening in the snow and over a rock face with running melt water,” and sadly did not survive. This tragic accident has brought an annually recurring hazard back into the thoughts of everyone within the outdoor community: the danger posed by snow bridges.  Read more…

30 More Donors to Reach Our Spring Goal

In the final push of our spring fundraising drive, we’re beyond thankful to the 270 donors who joined the campaign to help us reach our goal of 300 donors. If you haven’t yet joined the fun, we are only 30 people away from reaching our third and final matching challenge! This challenge invites you to consider any gift size that is meaningful to you. It all adds up to educational and experiential opportunities that get more people outside. Read more…

No Resolution on the Keta Legacy Foundation Lawsuit Against The Mountaineers

More than two months ago, I shared an update summarizing our efforts to amicably resolve the lawsuit that Keta Legacy Foundation filed against The Mountaineers in September 2019. In an effort to be transparent with our community, we shared the proposed settlement agreement that we sent to Keta. I received a number of messages from Mountaineers members expressing their appreciation for being kept informed about the lawsuit and that the proposal itself seemed like a very reasonable way to resolve this dispute. Read more…

Seeking Proposals! Equity & Emotional Safety in the Outdoors Online Course

The Mountaineers, in partnership with the Mountain Education Alliance (MEA), is looking to develop an online Equity & Emotional Safety in the Outdoors training for our volunteers. We're seeking DE&I (Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion) curriculum experts to submit proposals for consideration. Please help us spread the word. Read more…

Youth Outside | On the Road: How our youth van helped us navigate COVID-19

A little over a year ago, a colleague and I ventured about an hour north of Seattle to the little seaside town of Anacortes. Although tempted by views of nearby Mount Erie State Park, we were on our way to pick up the newest addition to The Mountaineers: a 15-passenger van. The vehicle was fated to take Mountaineers youth to the lakes, trails, and mountains surrounding Puget Sound. Read more…

Orca: Shared Waters, Shared Home Lauches June 1

Braided River author Lynda V. Mapes has traveled across the West Coast to give voice to the region’s orca whales, iconic to the Pacific Northwest’s beautiful—but ecologically imperiled—marine ecosystem. In this excerpt, she travels to OrcaLab in British Columbia, where passionate and determined volunteers are led by founder Paul Spong. Located on Cracroft Point, above Johnstone Strait in British Columbia, they have been documenting the daily lives of the more robust northern resident orca pods since 1970. Read more…

Climate Change Speaker Series Recap

During Earth Month, the Mountaineers Carbon Footprint Reduction Committee hosted a Climate Change Speaker Series to help our community learn more about the climate crisis. Mountaineers members and a Mountaineers Books author shared insights about how climate change will affect our world, our wild places, and our lives. The events were well attended and participants asked great questions of the presenters.  Read more…

Create Outdoor Connections for Life

Outdoor adventures offer us more than the simple reward of a beautiful view. Through time outside, we receive the gift of clarity and can discover a greater purpose. As we achieve our outdoor goals, we unlock the joy of feeling fully alive. The Mountaineers believes that everyone should have the opportunity to experience the beautiful infiniteness of nature, yet the keys to this kingdom are not found by simply walking out into the wilderness unprepared. Read more…

Mountaineers Bookstore Celebrates Grand Reopening

We're excited to announce that our Seattle Program Center bookstore will reopen for in-store browsing, beginning July 2. We'll be open for you to peruse from 9am-5pm Monday-Friday. 

Come check out the new books from our fall catalog and pick up some Green Trails maps to help you chart a course for summer fun! We also have Discover Passes & NW Forest Passes available for purchase.

Summer Book Sale 

July 1-30, 2021

The following discounts are available to Mountaineers members for books and other products in the bookstore:

  • 25% off all Mountaineers Books titles
  • 35% off all book bundles
  • 40% off all logo merchandise 
  • 20% off all USGS & Green Trails maps
  • 10% off book titles from other publishers
  • 10% off all other maps

We also have extra discounted items available: T-shirts for $2, and USGS maps for $1!

COVID-19 Updates

In accordance with Washington State and CDC guidelines, fully vaccinated individuals are may choose not to wear a mask in the bookstore. Partially  vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals are still required to wear masks. Our staff will be following these guidelines for vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. 

Regardless of your vaccination status, please mask when youth are present in the bathroom and lobby spaces. 

CAN I STILL ORDER ONLINE THROUGH MOUNTAINEERS BOOKS FOR IN-STORE PICKUP?

Yes! Feel free to swing by the bookstore anytime during open hours to pick up your order. We're happy to continue providing curbside pickup as an additional option to meet the needs of our community during this transition. Please call us during operating hours at 206-521-6001 and a staff member will meet you out front with your order.

OTHER QUESTIONS?

Get in touch by calling Member Services at 206-521-6001 or info@mountaineers.org

Bookmarks | Mud, Rocks, Blazes: Letting Go on the Appalachian Trail

MudRocksBlazes_Cover_Final.jpgI went to the Pacific Crest Trail to find my limit. I’d imagined my fastest known time attempt ending with me on hands and knees — dry heaving — at my utmost breaking point. Yet that never happened. I started the hike with my little plastic trowel, intent on digging deep as I’d learned to do over many ultramarathons, but the PCT laughed at that, and within a few days had handed me a full-size shovel instead. Read more…