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10 Essential Questions: Ed Dominguez

Each week we bring you a personal story from one of our members. For our member profile this week we talked to .... Read more…

Five Favorite Places in Seattle to Hike or Run

Thanks to an incredible landscape, the foresight of early city planners to build a world class park system, a government that values trails, and an active population engaged in a healthy outdoors lifestyle—when it comes to urban trails, Seattle is topnotch. The city’s park system contains a wide array of trails that traverse nature preserves, old-growth forests, historic districts, lake and Puget Sound shoreline, and vibrant neighborhoods.  Hike, run, walk Seattle’s urban trails. There are hundreds of miles of them, giving you many reasons to never leave the city when it comes to seeking excellent outdoor adventures. Here are five of my favorite places for a hike or run in the city. Read more…

Second Helpings: Bread Crumb Spaghetti

A book I worked on for the Fall 2018 season, Jill Lightner’s Scraps, Peels, and Stems, will have a lasting impact on me. The recipe for Spaghetti with Crumbs (we call it “that crumby spaghetti” at my house) is so simple—and I’ve made it so frequently—that I pretty much have it memorized by now, but I definitely turned to a Jill’s book (page 111) to see how to tell a truly fresh egg from a slightly more vintage one: Read more…

Looking Beyond Stoke: It’s Time To Educate The Masses

It’s no surprise to any of us who have been hiking and adventuring in our wild places since the days of heavy luggedsole boots, knee high cotton socks, and external frames that in the words of conservationist Rick McGuire of the North Cascades Conservation Council and Alpine Lakes Protection Society: we are currently facing a human tsunami on our trails. And if we’re to stay true to this metaphor, a tsunami inundating our wild places isn’t going to leave them in good shape. Read more…

Volunteers Needed! Recruiting for Inclusion Committee

The storied legacy and history of our 112-year old organization is our biggest asset, and our biggest weakness. Like all great mountains, The Mountaineers has a shadow side; a largely untold story where people have been excluded from or marginalized in the outdoors because of their skin color or gender or available resources or sexual orientation. It's time to change. Read more…

Baker Lodge Work Party & Cookout - Sep 28-30, 2018

Baker Lodge is a special place. Its stunning location looking up at Mount Shuksan, and the sense of community it creates, brings many people to this wonderful place. There's nothing better than a day outside followed by a hot cup of tea and a hearty dinner served up by the volunteer hosts. Read more…

Olympia Mountaineers Annual Recognition & Awards Banquet - Oct 27

You're invited to join us for the annual Olympia Mountaineers Banquet! Each year we gather to celebrate the work we have done, the fun we have had, and the friendships we made during the 2018 program year. Read more…

MountainLove | Wendell Brown & Roberta Spiro

In each issue of Mountaineer magazine, we feature two lovebirds who met through The Mountaineers and share a passion of the outdoors. In this column, we talked to Wendel Brown & Roberta Spiro, who met in 1980 and recently celebrated their 37th wedding anniversary. Read more…

Building A Safe and Respectful Culture

One of our Core Values is Community. We provide opportunities for all because we believe a diverse and inclusive outdoors inspires unity, respect, and passion for the places we love. To be true to this value, our commitment to treating one another respectfully must be iron-clad. When we do this consistently, day in and day out, we build the kind of culture where all people feel safe and can enjoy outdoor experiences to their fullest. Read more…

Celebrating K2: A Recap of our 40th Anniversary Event Series

It started with a phone call. Jim Whittaker, best known as the first American to summit Mt. Everest, had an idea. In 1978 'Big Jim' led the first Americans to the top of K2, and wanted to get his ’78 team back together, 40 years to the day of the summit. As a visionary leader, Jim knew the reunion would be a gathering for the ages and wanted to share the excitement with the community that supported him. Jim started climbing with us when he was fifteen, and as a lifelong Mountaineer he saw an opportunity to promote The Mountaineers, with all proceeds benefiting our nonprofit. We were honored and quick to agree. Read more…