Wilderness Weed Watchers 2014!

Get trained to identify and remove invasive plant species in wilderness areas.
Katherine Hollis Katherine Hollis
May 19, 2014

It’s that time of the year again - help protect the wilderness while hiking this summer!

Invasive non-native plants are a major threat to biodiversity in our National Forests. Without early detection and eradication, weeds like yellow archangel, orange hawkweed, and Himalayan blackberry quickly crowd native species. Uncontrolled, weeds like oxeye daisy can monopolize alpine meadows, English ivy will cover forest canopies and Japanese knotweed will choke creek-side vegetation.

You can help detect and prevent major invasive plant infestations while enjoying hikes in Washington’s incredible wilderness areas!

The Wilderness Weed Watchers Program trains volunteers to identify, map and control invasive species along backcountry trails and campsites. In partnership with Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and King County, volunteers gain skills in plant identification, enjoy scenic hikes and contribute important data to the U.S. Forest Service. After the training, Weed Watchers “adopt” trails to survey during the 2013 field season--volunteers can choose from short day hikes or overnight outings. 

Thank you to the National Forests Foundation for providing funding for this program!

Interested volunteers should register for an upcoming Weed Watchers training. After the training, Weed Watchers “adopt” trails to survey during the 2013 field season--volunteers can choose from short day hikes or overnight outings. Weed Watchers submit their data after each survey. GPS units are available for check-out.

Primary June 2014 training:

Sunday June 1, 9am-4pm
North Bend Ranger Station: 902 SE North Bend Way, Bldg 1. North BendWA 98045