Self Rescue II  Advanced Techniques - Everett - 2006

Climbing Course

Self Rescue II

Self Rescue II - Advanced Techniques - Everett

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Course Description: The Everett Branch Self Rescue Course (SRC) is comprised of three components, SRC I, SRC II and SRC III. Together they will develop fundamental skills applicable to self rescue while climbing on rock, glacier and ice. The emphasis will be on a party of two’s self sufficiency in the mountains. This course is primarily focused on skills development and is scenario based. Leadership aspects of handling an emergency, anchor building and first aid are beyond the scope of this course. SRC II – Advanced Techniques will build on the skills introduced in SRC I. The primary scenario will involve rescuing a fallen leader. This module will provide an introduction to alpine aid technique. Expectations: This is an advanced level climbing course. It is not intended for novice climbers. Minimum requirements will be the ability to lead on rock, build multi-point gear anchors, and completion of SRC1. This class will require the ability to improvise as necessary with limited gear. It is assumed that participants will be fluent with the baseline skills of use of the autobloc rappel backup, escaping from a loaded belay and the transition of load to the anchor via the Munter Mule Knot. These skills are introduced in the Everett Branch Basic Climbing Course, taught in the Crag and Intermediate Climbing Course, or can be easily picked up through reading Chapter 4 of David Fasulo’s book Self-Rescue.

Course Description: The Everett Branch Self Rescue Course (SRC) is comprised of three components, SRC I, SRC II and SRC III. Together they will develop fundamental skills applicable to self rescue while climbing on rock, glacier and ice. The emphasis will be on a party of two’s self sufficiency in the mountains. This course is primarily focused on skills development and is scenario based. Leadership aspects of handling an emergency, anchor building and first aid are beyond the scope of this course. SRC II – Advanced Techniques will build on the skills introduced in SRC I. The primary scenario will involve rescuing a fallen leader. This module will provide an introduction to alpine aid technique. Approach: Due to the complex technical nature of self rescue, our traditional methods of instructing are not efficient for our purposes. This course will build a framework to facilitate individual self learning through hands on problem solving in small groups. Much of the onus will be placed on independent pairings of students to do the reading in advance, to work through scenarios, and to essentially teach themselves these skills at their own pace and on their own schedules in preparation for the scheduled field trip modules. It is within the independent groups that the actual learning will take place. Instructors will work with these groups to answer questions and oversee basic safety. The discussion forums within the Mountaineers website will be relied upon heavily to share learnings, best practices and to coordinate practice sessions. The field trips modules are intended to share best practices in a group setting and to validate competency in skills. This is in striking contrast to how traditional Mountaineers courses are run, i.e. classroom lectures with instructional field trips. Expectations: This is an advanced level climbing course. It is not intended for novice climbers. It will require the ability to improvise as necessary with limited gear. You will have roughly three weeks prior to each field trip module to prepare. Plan to make allowances to meet with your group at least weekly to prepare for the field trip modules. It is assumed that participants will be fluent with the baseline skills of use of the autobloc rappel backup, escaping from a loaded belay and the transition of load to the anchor via the Munter Mule Knot. These skills are introduced in the Everett Branch Basic Climbing Course, taught in the Crag and Intermediate Climbing Course, or can be easily picked up through reading Chapter 4 of David Fasulo’s book Self-Rescue.
Course Requirements

This course has no scheduled activities.

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Course Materials

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