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The Sharp End of Life & the Rope: Dierdre Wolownick-Honnold

Dierdre Wolownick has lived an interesting life - mother, wife, teacher, musician, linguist, writer, runner and climber. Her son Alex Honnold is one of the two or three most famous rock climbers in the world. Dierdre herself started climbing late in life and at age 65 she climbed El Cap, making her the oldest woman to accomplish the feat. Find out how the author of The Sharp End of Life: A Mother's Story keeps life exciting. Read more…

Outside Insight | An Important How To: Create Inclusive Experiences

The Mountaineers annual Leadership Conference is dedicated to the ongoing development of our volunteer leaders. Discussions on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) have been incorporated since its inception in 2014, and we’ve strived to include a wide array of presenters and sessions centered on inclusive and equitable programs. At the 2018 conference, we chose to introduce a full track focused on DEI, an exciting first for this event. Read more…

North Plaza Friction Slab Traffic Safety

The North Plaza friction slabs at our Seattle Program Center have become a popular resource, and it's important we keep safety in mind during course instruction. We ask you, as leaders and participants, to be aware of large groups spilling out into nearby streets or frequently crossing the eastern roadway, as this creates the potential for a traffic accident.  Read more…

Let's celebrate! 2019 National Volunteer Week

For the entirety of our 113-year history, volunteers have been at the heart of The Mountaineers mission. From big to small, nearly every aspect of what we do is powered by our volunteers! We truly cannot thank you enough for your leadership and service, and we're excited to have another opportunity to celebrate your hard-work and accomplishments during the 2019 National Volunteer Week! Read more…

Voices Heard | Changing the Face of Mountaineering

With just three days left in his 23-day, reality television ordeal, Don Nguyen was the very embodiment of the show’s title, “Naked and Afraid.” Cold rain and winds pounded and compromised his primitive shelter in the Namibian wilderness. As he shivered uncontrollably, in the buff and borderline hypothermic, he pondered an ending that he ultimately refused to accept. Read more…

10 Essential Questions: Tyson Hulbert

Each week we bring you a personal story from one of our members. For our member profile this week we talked to... Read more…

Car Camping and Backpacking Gear Comes to the Gear Library!

Our new Gear Library is committed to helping the next generation explore the outdoors. Since launching in August 2018, we have partnered with local youth-serving agencies to offer free access to outdoor gear to help increase access to our wild places.  We are excited to announce that car camping and backpacking gear are now included in our gear offerings! Attend our upcoming Gear Library orientation on April 8 to learn more. Read more…

Southcentral Alaska Goal Hikes

Hiking goals in Alaska are as diverse as the people you meet out on the trail; they come in all shapes, sizes and ambitions. But one thing is pretty universal: The ideal of an end-of-summer “goal hike” that you train for all summer long. Read more…

Did You Know? The John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

The John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is an exciting and interesting trip largely due to its uniquely well-preserved fossilized records of Cenozoic life. The evidence of past life is observed in the geologic strata, hills, valleys, and rock terraces of this incredibly spot in Eastern Oregon. Read more…

Trail Talk | Reflections on a Life Reared Outdoors

I was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut; the largest city in one of the country’s most densely populated states. Located 50 miles east of New York City, Bridgeport was an industrial powerhouse from the late 1800s to just after World War II. The city attracted waves of immigrants and was, and still is, incredibly diverse. I lived in the city’s Little Italy neighborhood where Italian and Yiddish were freely spoken. I remember a lot of little old ladies in black dresses. My parents were not outdoorspeople, nor were my friends. My neighborhood of tightly-packed two and three family homes was no Walden Pond. Read more…