Basic Snowshoeing Lecture

Lecture: Basic Snowshoeing Course

Basic Snowshoeing Lecture - Online Classroom

Learn how to get out in the winter wonderland confidently and safely on snowshoes.

Info
COVID-19: Learn about our most up-to-date guidance for participants and leaders on our COVID-19 Response page. All participants and leaders must agree to the COVID-19 Code of Conduct before participating in this Mountaineers activity.
  • For Beginners (Getting Started Series)

The lecture will begin online via Zoom at 6:30 PM. Details will be sent ahead of the lecture date.

A lecture with time for student Q&A covering all the knowledge needed to snowshoe. Included will be discussion of general winter gear and snowshoe-specific gear, gear rental and purchase options, snowshoe trip planning, winter safety, avalanche and terrain awareness, snowshoe movement techniques, relevant winter activity-related websites and other resources and  area snowshoe destinations and routes.

In addition to the lecture, slideshow, and Q&A, there will also be snowshoe gear tables set up for students to peruse and ask questions about, with examples of different kinds of snowshoes, appropriate boots, outerwear, gaiters, poles and examples of the Ten Essentials.

Route/Place
Roster
Required Equipment

Required Equipment

A large part of the classroom evening is devoted to gear and clothing, how/why to choose it and where it may be purchased or rented. We suggest that those new to snowshoeing refrain from purchasing new equipment until after the classroom session, or try borrowing it from friends before you spend money.  This will probably avoid a few of the missteps of over-purchasing or purchasing inadequate gear.  One thing to remember, NO COTTON.

 Important note: Some people's feet get colder more quickly than others, and everyone's feet are different. Students should wear winter boots with insulation for snowshoeing.  If you're bringing a pair of boots that you wear in the summer, they're not warm enough. The guidance we give for snowshoeing is to wear insulated, waterproof Winter Boots. They have thick soles, rubber/leather uppers and insulation. If you're not sure, Winter Boots are made to wear in snow and are too warm to wear in summer.

Winter Boot.jpg

A limited number of MSR snowshoes will be available for students to rent. If you're interested in this option, please contact the leader for more information.

For  the  field  trip,  and on regular trips, you  must  bring  your Clothing & Equipment and  Ten Essentials.

TEN ESSENTIALS

Map (provided to you), compass, sunglasses and sunscreen, extra clothing, emergency shelter, headlamp/flashlight, first-aid supplies, fire starter, matches, knife, extra food and water. Sun protection is a must. Snow reflection is highly damaging to eyes; UV damage and sunburns are common if proper protection is not used.

CLOTHING & EQUIPMENT

  • Winter boots (insulated)
  • Gaiters
  • Snowshoes
  • Backpack (large enough for all winter gear)
  • Ski / trekking poles with snow baskets
  • Clothing layers (adjustable to your activity level and the weather - No cotton)
    • Base layer: Wicking liner socks, glove liners, synthetic or wool long underwear that wicks away moisture, insulates well and dries quickly. Lightweight or midweight versions are available; pick a thickness based on the temperature and your activity level. A zippered top lets you adjust body heat as you stop and go.
    • Insulating layer: Wool socks, synthetic soft-shell pants, Polartec® or Primaloft® polyester mid-layer jackets. "Active Insulation" clothing makes a good mid-layer since it retains heat when wet and breathes as you exercise.
    • Outer layer: A waterproof, breathable shell jacket and pants that keep you dry and fend off wind.
  • Hats, Gloves and Accessories (to prevent loss of body heat/protect from sunburn)
    • A wool or synthetic hat, headband or balaclava retains heat; a wide-brimmed hat or a ball cap can shade your eyes on sunny days or keep snow out of your eyes.
    • Waterproof ski gloves or mittens are a must to keep your hands dry and warm. On cold days, combine shells with fleece mittens or gloves. In milder conditions, glove liners may be all you need.
    • A scarf or neck gaiter is a must especially on windy days, or if you tend to get cold easily.

Additional  Recommended  Equipment:  

  • Foam sit pad
  • Hand and toe warmers
  • Pack cover
  • Toilet paper, sealable plastic bags, and hand sanitizer
  • Dry clothes and shoes in your car for the trip home
  • Garbage bags in your car for wet gear
  • Camera and extra batteries, if desired
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