Conservation & Advocacy

Conservation & Advocacy

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Action Alert: The Government Shutdown and Its Impact on Public Lands

The government shutdown is now the longest in history, and it may continue for weeks or even months. One of the most visible manifestations of the shutdown has been its effects on our national parks, many of which are being kept open despite having few staff and no budget. Read more…

Winter Wildlands Backcountry Film Festival - Jan 10 & Jan 21

Calling all “go big or go home” winter enthusiasts! Get ready to get goosebumps while you “Ooh!” and “Ahh!” at the impact and importance of our winter wildlands through this collection of short films. The fourteenth annual Winter Wildlands Alliance Backcountry Film Festival will screen in  Bellevue on January 10 and in Seattle at The Mountaineers Seattle Program Center on January 21.  Read more…

New Things to Try in 2019 (with Mountaineers Books)

Welcome to 2019, everyone! It’s that time of the year when ambitions are high, and confidence is running even higher. It’s really time to carpe that diem! And if you are not already cranking your music playlist to loop “Eye of the Tiger” ad nauseam because you are not sure what to do this year, hey – we got a few suggestions for you. Veni, vidi, vici! (Guess who just checked “learning Latin” off this year’s list?) Read more…

Conservation Currents | What Does the Future of Conservation Look Like?

Lovers of wild places owe a lot to the year 1968. That fall, Congress gave us three key conservation victories: the establishment of North Cascades National Park, the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, and the National Trails System Act. Read more…

Voices Heard | Solitude vs. Community: There’s No “Right” Way to Be Outside

The first time I tried my hand at astrophotography (shooting the stars, as opposed to shooting stars) was on a clear night just outside Mount Rainier National Park. I was renting a cabin with my wife and her family, a trio of sisters from Colombia who spoke frequently about the possibility of seeing wildlife. I left them for the pitch darkness down the road along the Nisqually River. Read more…

Give Today to Support Outdoor Advocacy and Stewardship

As advocates for public lands, we work hard to effect positive change on issues at the intersection of conservation and recreation. A large part of this work is creating avenues for our members - and the greater outdoor community - to take action to protect our wild places. We have a unique impact in protecting the outdoor experience. That said, public policy is complex, victories can be slow, and our public lands are chronically underfunded. Read more…

Q&A with Jeremy Collins

Artist Jeremy Collins roams the globe with sketchbooks in hand, dumping his soul into their pages. In the folds of those pages  his particular worldview was born—from authentic travel and adventures as an exploratory rock climber to award-winning filmmaker and author. Read more…

Flying to Denver? Check out these wild Dave Showalter photos!

Braided River, the conservation imprint of Mountaineers Books, is proud to present a brand new photography exhibit "Colorado: Sage Spirit and Roaring Rivers" in Concourse A of Denver's International Airport. An award-winning photographer, Dave Showalter has captured the spirit of Colorado wildlife and paired them with stories of Westerners working to preserve the land they love. Read more…

Footprints: Hiking vs. Carbon

Our family has hiked together since our 12-year-old daughter was a newborn. I remember our daughter’s first decade as a series of literal peaks and valleys, many of them in the Olympics. I can picture her chasing butterflies over Marmot Pass at age five, and searching for fairies in old growth cathedrals along the Dungeness River. When she finished first grade we backpacked into Grand Valley, then clambered up Grand Peak, a perch with majestic views into the heart of the Olympic wilderness. Read more…

Introducing Outdoor Advocates Network!

At a time when public lands and waters are under unprecedented attack, the outdoor community needs the knowledge and resources to protect the outdoor experience. That’s why we’re launching Outdoor Advocates Network, a resource where you can learn about and take action to champion our public lands. Read more…

Thank You For Supporting #GivingTuesday

This last #GivingTuesday, our community gathered with us to support our Mountaineers Access Program (MAP) scholarship fund. This fund supports those who would not otherwise be able to participate in Mountaineers programs.  Read more…

Caribou Rainforest

The following is excerpted from Caribou Rainforest: From Heartbreak to Hope by David Moskowitz. This is from Chapter Four, "Mountain Caribou: Ghosts of the Rainforest."  Read more…

This #GivingTuesday, Support Future Volunteer Leaders

Community is the foundation of The Mountaineers. We come together to learn, grow, and enjoy incredible transformations in the outdoors. This #GivingTuesday, we ask you to support our community by donating to The Mountaineers Access Program (MAP) scholarship fund. Read more…

Keep Calm and Learn to Climb: How Mountain Workshops Improves Life Skills

“You should have seen my classroom before we started with The Mountaineers,” says Robin Gannett, a teacher at Aki Kurose Middle School. “It’s a completely different classroom now.” Read more…

Make a Difference for Youth Through Our MAP Scholarship Fund

The Mountaineers relies on the generosity of our community to provide courses and programs that make a difference in so many lives. Last year, donors gave $65,000 in scholarships that made it possible for 492 youth and 54 adults to experience the wonders of the great outdoors - many for the first time. We have set a goal to raise $20,000 to specifically support The Mountaineers Access Program (MAP) by the end of the year, and this #GivingTuesday all donations will go directly to support MAP scholarships, because everyone should have access to the outdoors.  Read more…

Voices Heard | A Seattle Urban Park Ranger Bringing Diversity to the Outdoors

White, male and “midcareer,” Seattle’s Charles Beall in a lot of ways is the face of the National Park Service that turned 100 on August 25, 2016.

He also may be the best hope the agency has for changing that face to match the diversity that is rapidly transforming this country. And the reasons essentially start out the same: Because he is white, male and “midcareer.” Read more…

Conservation Currents | Senator Ranker Talks Surfing, Bagels, and Championing Our Public Lands

Fresh off a trail run behind his house on Orcas Island, Washington State Senator Kevin Ranker hopped on the phone with The Mountaineers, exclaiming “I got outside this morning; everything’s good!” The senator joined us on the heels of a grueling legislative session in Olympia and was recharging as he always has: with a healthy dose of nature. Ranker has been bridging passion (for the outdoors) and policy, since taking office in 2008. He was instrumental in bringing our state its first policy advisor on outdoor recreation, implementing No Child Left Inside legislation, and establishing the San Juan Islands National Monument — all important issues to The Mountaineers. Read more…

Low-Trash Backpacking

Backpacking provides isolation, time away from the stresses of work and home, and a window into the natural world. However, there is one element of backpacking that’s incongruent with its value set: trash. Read more…

Action Alert: Support the Methow Headwaters’ 20-Year Mineral Withdrawal

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is currently accepting comments on a 20-year mineral withdrawal to protect the Methow Headwaters from industrial-scale mining threats. This comment period marks another major milestone in our efforts to safeguard this stunning area, home to some of the nation's best hiking, skiing, climbing, and mountain biking. Read more…

Self-Care in the Mountains: Magic in the Rwenzoris

The Mountaineers first met Tyrhee Moore in The Adventure Gap, a book we published chronicling the first all African-American summit attempt on Denali. Tyrhee was among the youngest of nine climbers, ranging in age from 17 to 65, to attempt the climb America’s highest peak. Since the 2013 expedition, his outdoor resume has grown to include Grand Teton, Mount Kilimanjaro, and Aconcagua. His experiences and challenges in the outdoors have garnered national attention, and he’s risen as an advocate for increasing interest and advocacy amongst black youth in outdoor spaces. Today Tyrhee speaks around the country on topics regarding the adventure gap and conservation leadership, and is a champion for increasing diversity in the outdoors. Read more…

Outside Insight | Stewardship Through The Eyes of a Land Manager

Sarah Lange is an outdoor recreation planner for the U.S. Forest Service. She’s also a former Mountaineers staff member, working as the Public Lands Program Manager from 2010-2013. At the 2017 Mountaineers Leadership Conference, Sarah was part of a land manager and partners panel and discussed ways that Mountaineers leaders can integrate stewardship and low-impact recreation into their trips and activities. Heading into the busy summer season, I caught up with Sarah to better understand her perspective as a land manager, and to learn more about how our leaders can encourage and inspire others to be responsible stewards of our public lands. Read more…

Did you Know? Boulder Cave Bats

The Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest is a large, diverse landscape, encompassing over 4 million acres along the eastern slopes of the Cascade Range. It's home to the one and only Boulder Cave located east of Mt Rainier National Park. Read more…

The Mountaineers Endorse I-1631: Investing in a Healthy Outdoors and Clean Energy for Washington

The Mountaineers endorses Washington State ballot Initiative 1631 because we believe that a healthy environment is essential to the future of outdoor recreation and public lands. Read more…

New Legislation to Help Groups Get Outside

We’re thrilled to announce the introduction of bipartisan legislation that we’ve been working on for a number of years: the Public Lands Recreational Opportunities Improvement Act (PLROIA) - S.3550! Read more…

Conservation Currents | Stoke Is Exactly What Outdoor Conservation Needs

High Country News recently published an essay by Ethan Linck, “Your Stoke Won’t Save Us,” questioning the efficacy of outdoor recreationists and the outdoor industry as advocates for conservation. In a sense, Linck is right, stoke alone won’t save us, and the most unimpeachable personal conservation ethic won’t either. Read more…

Nature's Way | Rare Plants, Marine Birds, and a Warming Ocean

When worlds collide, it’s usually a bad thing. But when geology and botany come together for Mark Darrach, he’s as happy as a Polystichum lemmonii on an ultramafic substrate. Read more…

MAC Teens Tackle Trail Work Project at Liberty Bell

For a few days in late August, a group of students from our Mountaineers Adventure Club (MAC) joined the Access Fund's Conservation Team for stewardship work at Washington Pass. The project improved the well-used, but ill-maintained climber’s path that branches off of the Blue Lake Trail to access climbs on Liberty Bell, one of Washington’s most coveted and impressive peaks.  Read more…

Trail Talk | Looking Beyond Stoke: It’s Time To Educate The Masses

It’s no surprise to any of us who have been hiking and adventuring in our wild places since the days of heavy luggedsole boots, knee high cotton socks, and external frames that in the words of conservationist Rick McGuire of the North Cascades Conservation Council and Alpine Lakes Protection Society: we are currently facing a human tsunami on our trails. And if we’re to stay true to this metaphor, a tsunami inundating our wild places isn’t going to leave them in good shape. Read more…

Land and Water Conservation Fund Set to Expire (Again) – Take Action!

UPDATE: Congress let LWCF expire at the end of September. However, on Oct 2, Senator Maria Cantwell, with Senator Richard Burr's, bill to reauthorize LWCF passed out of committee - an important hurdle in saving LWCF. 

Hailed as America’s best conservation program, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) is set to expire on September 30, 2018 unless Congress takes action. For over 50 years, LWCF funds have helped build and improve trails and trailheads, parks, river put-ins, and climbing areas, benefiting everything from city green spaces to national parks. Read more…

Green Snoqualmie Day - October 6, 2018

With the threat of invasive species, we are at risk of losing Snoqualmie's greatest treasure: our forests. The Green Snoqualmie Partnership continues the region's forest legacy and invites people of all ages to get outside, have fun, and engage in helping restore our green spaces. Read more…