Backcountry Snowshoe Skills Course - Seattle - 2014

Snowshoeing Course

Intermediate Snowshoeing Course

Backcountry Snowshoe Skills Course - Seattle

Info
COVID-19: Learn about our most up-to-date guidance for participants and leaders on our COVID-19 Response page. All participants and leaders must agree to the COVID-19 Code of Conduct before participating in this Mountaineers course.

Registration for this activity includes both the lecture and the all-day field trip (location and logistical details provided at the lecture). Please note that attendance at the Lecture is MANDATORY in order for you to take the Field Trip.

The Backcountry Snowshoe Skills course is designed for adventurers who want to gain the skills and experience to handle more challenging snowshoe routes and terrain than those offered in Easy or Easy+ trips. Moderate and Strenuous trips are, in many cases, non-technical mountain-climbing routes with mountain peaks for destinations. The course will cover material needed to survive in backcountry terrain, including introductory avalanche awareness and response, incident response, emergency shelters, self-belay and self-arrest skills. This course is open to graduates of Basic Snowshoe (or formerly Snowshoe Lite) and also to graduates from Alpine Scrambling or Basic Climbing. See the snowshoe program web site for full details.

Current students and graduates of Backcountry Snowshoe Skills will be eligible to participate in Moderate and Strenuous snowshoe trips. Students must have already completed the field trip.

You must be fit for the more physically demanding courses like Snowshoeing, Alpine Scrambling or Basic Climbing. Try hiking up Mt. Si (8 miles round-trip; 3,550 ft. elevation gain) and see how you do. If you can get to the top of Mt. Si (to the view points in the haystack basin) in 2½ hours or less (barring icy conditions), you are probably in adequate condition for this course.

An ice axe is required for this course. Guidelines on how to choose a general ice axe (not for technical ice climbing) will be provided to you at the lecture, or students can go to a local outdoor retailer and request sizing assistance.

Carpooling for the field trip is strongly recommended, due to parking limitations. Read and understand how carpooling at the Mountaineers works. Please specify your carpool preferences for the field trip when signing up (or edit them later). Then click the link in your Profile to view other students' carpool preferences so that you can organize your own carpooling arrangements.

Students have until 4/30 to complete their requirements for graduation, which includes successful completion of the Navigation Course offered this spring in February and March.

Mountaineers members only

For additional questions, please email Larry.

Registration for this activity includes both the lecture on 1/29 and the all-day field trip on 2/8 (location and logistical details provided at the lecture). Please note that attendance at the Lecture is MANDATORY in order for you to take the Field Trip.

The Backcountry Snowshoe Skills course is designed for adventurers who want to gain the skills and experience to handle more challenging snowshoe routes and terrain than those offered in Easy or Easy+ trips. Moderate and Strenuous trips are, in many cases, non-technical mountain-climbing routes with mountain peaks for destinations. The course will cover material needed to survive in backcountry terrain, including introductory avalanche awareness and response, incident response, emergency shelters, self-belay and self-arrest skills. This course is open to graduates of Basic Snowshoe (or formerly Snowshoe Lite) and also to graduates from Alpine Scrambling or Basic Climbing. See the snowshoe program web site for full details.

Current students and graduates of Backcountry Snowshoe Skills will be eligible to participate in Moderate and Strenuous snowshoe trips. Students must have already completed the field trip.

You must be fit for the more physically demanding courses like Snowshoeing, Alpine Scrambling or Basic Climbing. Try hiking up Mt. Si (8 miles round-trip; 3,550 ft. elevation gain) and see how you do. If you can get to the top of Mt. Si (to the view points in the haystack basin) in 2½ hours or less (barring icy conditions), you are probably in adequate condition for this course.

An ice axe is required for this course. Guidelines on how to choose a general ice axe (not for technical ice climbing) will be provided to you at the lecture, or students can go to a local outdoor retailer and request sizing assistance.

Carpooling for the field trip is strongly recommended, due to parking limitations. Read and understand how carpooling at the Mountaineers works. Please specify your carpool preferences for the field trip when signing up (or edit them later). Then click the link in your Profile to view other students' carpool preferences so that you can organize your own carpooling arrangements.

Students have until 4/30 to complete their requirements for graduation, which includes successful completion of the Navigation Course offered this spring in February and March.

Mountaineers members only

For additional questions, please email Larry.

Badges you will earn:

Course Requirements
Course Activity Date Availability Leader
Intermediate Snowshoeing Lecture
Online Classroom
Wed, Jan 20, 2021
Registration closes Jan 17
1 participant
4 instructors
Intermediate Snowshoeing Field Trip #1 Preview
Online Classroom
Thu, Jan 28, 2021
Registration closes Jan 26
1 participant
4 instructors
Intermediate Snowshoeing Field Trip #1
Olallie/Radio Mountain
Sat, Jan 30, 2021
Registration closes Jan 26
1 participant on waitlist
0 instructors
Skyline Lake
Sat, Jan 30, 2021
Registration closes Jan 26
1 participant
0 instructors
Skyline Lake
Sun, Jan 31, 2021
Registration closes Jan 26
1 participant
0 instructors
Intermediate Snowshoeing Field Trip #2 Preview
Online Classroom
Thu, Feb 11, 2021
Registration closes Feb 9
0 participants
4 instructors
Intermediate Snowshoeing Field Trip #2
Skyline Lake
Sat, Feb 13, 2021
Registration closes Feb 9
0 participants
1 instructor on waitlist
Olallie/Radio Mountain
Sat, Feb 13, 2021
Registration closes Feb 9
2 participants on waitlist
1 instructor on waitlist
Skyline Lake
Sun, Feb 14, 2021
Registration closes Feb 9
2 participants
0 instructors

Additional badges needed to graduate

Completed

Roster
Required Equipment

What  to  Bring  on  the  Backcountry  Snowshoe  Skills  Field  Trip   Snowshoes,  the  Ten  Essentials  and  wool  or  synthetic  pile  clothing,  and  an  ice  axe  and  helmet  (see  below)  are  required.  Gear   is  not  available  at  the  trailhead.  You  must  arrange  for  your  own  rentals  in  advance  of  a  trip.  A  Gear  List  can  be  found  near   the  end  of  this  course  guide.     What  to  Bring  on  a  Non-­‐Course  Moderate  or  Strenuous  Snowshoe  Tour   In  addition  to  the  gear  and  clothing  one  should  bring  to  an  easier  snowshoe  trip,  additional  gear  may  be  necessary  or   required  by  a  trip  leader.  Geography,  weather,  and  avalanche  conditions  are  factors  that  necessitate  additional  equipment.     Such  gear  may  include:  ice  axe,  shovel,  avalanche  probe,  avalanche  beacon,  or  portable  traction  devices  such  as  crampons,   YakTrax  or  Microspikes.  Trip  leaders  will  note  in  their  activity  descriptions  and/or  follow-­‐up  correspondences  what   additional  equipment  they  expect  trip  participants  to  bring.  Participants  are  expected  to  procure  their  own  items.     The  Ice  Axe   An  ice  axe  is  essential  for  snowshoeing  trips  rated  Moderate  or  above.  You  can  also  use  it  for  alpine  scrambling  and   mountain  climbing.  Get  a  general-­‐purpose  ice  axe  with  a  curved  head  and  a  shape  comfortable  enough  to  carry  in  your  hand  for  several  hours.   The  ones  with  rubber  sleeves  on  the  shaft  may  give  you  a  good  grip  and  insulate  from  the  cold,  but  they  are  difficult  to  pull   out  of  the  snow  during  self-­‐belay.  Get  covers  for  the  spike  and  pick  to  protect  you  and  your  snowshoeing  buddies  when  you   carry  the  axe  on  your  pack.       The  appropriate  ice  axe  length  is  determined  by  a  combination  of  your  arm  length  and  your  height. To  check  for  the  right   ice  axe  length  for  you,  stand  in  a  relaxed  position  with  your  arm  straight  down  at  your  side,  holding  the  axe  with  your  palm   flat  on  top  of  the  head  and  your  fingers  wrapped  around.    The  spike  should  come  down  to  mid-­‐ankle.  For  most  people,  that   measurement  will  correspond  to  a  65  cm  or  70  cm  axe.  Most  snowshoers  and  scramblers  find  this  length  most  versatile:  a   longer  axe  is  heavier  and  more  awkward  to  use  as  the  slope  steepens;  shorter  axes  won’t  support  you  except  on  technical   terrain.  You’ll  want  a  wrist  loop  or  leash  on  your  axe  so  you  don’t  lose  it.  You  can  make  one  from  5  feet  of  narrow  nylon   webbing  or  purchase  a  commercially  available  leash. Remember  that  an  ice  axe  is  a  sharp  “weapon”  and  can  injure  you  or  your  partners.  Carry  it  properly  and  use  it  with  care. Helmet/Head  Protection   The  climbing  helmet,  a  standard  piece  of  equipment  for  climbers  and  scramblers,  is  designed  to  protect  your  head  from   falling  objects  such  as  rock  fall  or  another  climber’s  falling  gear.  It  is  also  designed  to  protect  you  from  the  impact  of  falling   on  hard  surfaces  such  as  rock  or  ice.   While  helmets  are  not  standard  equipment  for  snowshoers,  due  to  the  nature  of  ice  axe  arrest  practice,  we  will  be  using   them  for  the  Backcountry  Snowshoe  Skills  field  trip.  If  you  have  your  own  climbing  helmet,  please  bring  it  to  the  field  trip.   We  will  also  have  several  on  hand  to  lend  to  students  for  the  day.  

Course Materials

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