Alpine Lakes: Protecting Wilderness in our Backyard - The Mountaineers - 2012

Stewardship Course

Alpine Lakes: Protecting Wilderness in our Backyard

Alpine Lakes: Protecting Wilderness in our Backyard

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Have you driven the Lake Dorothy Highway that runs along the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River, along Lake Dorothy, to Highway 2?
What about the Jack Creek Road that cuts through the Teanaway valley to Leavenworth?
The mining road to Dutch Miller and La Bohn Gap?
Did you invest in the housing development on the shores of Lake Klonaqua?
What do you think of the logging operation going on at Larch Lake in the Chiwaukum mountains?
If you’re scratching your head at these questions, then you know these scenarios are not possible, because all these locations are within the boundaries of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area. The nearly 400,000 acres of lush forests, sapphire lakes and striking peaks protected within the wilderness area were once the target of aggressive resource extraction and development. It took a grass-roots citizens’ movement to preserve these wilderness gems, and the work continues. Now you may ask, what did it take to engage citizens, to tackle the forces of industry and garner the necessary political momentum to establish the Alpine Lakes Wilderness? Come to The Mountaineers Program Center at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, June 13, for “Alpine Lakes: Wilderness in Our Backyard” to learn what it took. The seminar will include presentations and discussions by five people who greatly influenced the movement to establish the wilderness area, sparked cleanup efforts in the Middle Fork Snoqualmie Valley and are leading the current initiative to expand the Alpine Lakes Wilderness by 22,000 acres and designate the Middle Fork Snoqualmie and Pratt rivers as Wild and Scenic. Speakers include Doug Scott of Campaign for America's Wilderness, Rick McGuire of the Alpine Lakes Protection Society, Mark Boyar of the Middle Fork Outdoor Recreation Coalition, Tom Uniack of Washington Wild, and Tom O'Keefe of American Whitewater. Participants will be invited to a hike or scramble on Saturday, June 16 to an area that would be protected by the proposed Alpine Lakes expansion. The seminar and field trips are free and open to the public, thanks to grant support from The Mountaineers Foundation. Enjoy a mellow hike through the lush lowlands of the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River Valley to see firsthand the improvements in the valley and investigate the new Pratt Connector Trail. Sign up. Those looking for a more adventurous foray may choose to scramble to Snoqualmie Mountain (participants must meet scrambling prerequisites). Dividing the Alpental and Commonwealth valleys, Snoqualmie Mountain straddles the current Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area and the proposed addition. From its summit you can see all at once the reasons citizens united to lobby for protection of these mountains, valleys and rivers. Participants must meet Mountaineers scrambling qualifications. Details.

Have you driven the Lake Dorothy Highway that runs along the Middle Fork Snoqualmie, winds through the mountains, along Lake Dorothy, and pops out at the Miller River Road and Highway 2? What about the Jack Creek Road that cuts through the Teanaway valley to Leavenworth? The mining road to Dutch Miller and La Bohn Gap? Did you invest in the housing development on the shores of Lake Klonaqua? What do you think of the logging operation going on at Larch Lake in the Chiwaukum mountains? If you’re scratching your head at this, then you know these scenarios are not possible, because all these locations are within the boundaries of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness. If not for this success of a grass-roots movement in the to protect nearly 400,000 acres from aggressive resource extraction and development 1960’s and 70’s, much of the lush forests of Doug-fir, Western red cedar, Sitka Spruce, Ponderosa pine and Engelmann Spruce might be scrappy second growth forest, recovering from logging operations, and mines would operate at Dutch Miller Gap and Van Epps Pass. What did it take to engage citizens, tackle industry forces and garner the necessary political momentum to establish the Alpine Lakes Wilderness? Join The Mountaineers at 7pm, June 13 at the Program Center for the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Seminar, an evening of presentations and discussions with four people who influenced the movement to establish the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, sparked cleanup efforts in the Middle Fork Snoqualmie valley and are leading the current initiative to expand the Alpine Lakes Wilderness by 22,000 acres and designate the Middle Fork Snoqualmie and Pratt as Wild and Scenic Rivers. Participants will have the opportunity to join a hike or scramble on June 16 to an area that would be protected by the proposed Alpine Lakes expansion.
Course Requirements

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